‘Mystery of the Trees’: BCHGS to discuss Wells’ book
Apr 10, 2013 | 937 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
This bent tree is located in Northeast Georgia. The trees were thought to be used by Native Americans to mark trails, water sources, sacred grounds and graves. The trees were located along the trails used by Native Americans before the Cherokee Removal.  Most of the trees have been lost to age and progress. (Photograph provided by Don Wells.)
This bent tree is located in Northeast Georgia. The trees were thought to be used by Native Americans to mark trails, water sources, sacred grounds and graves. The trees were located along the trails used by Native Americans before the Cherokee Removal. Most of the trees have been lost to age and progress. (Photograph provided by Don Wells.)
slideshow
The Bradley County Historical and Genealogical Society will meet on Sunday at 2:30 p.m. at the Cleveland Public Library.

The meeting is free and open to the public.

The guest speaker will be author Don Wells of Jasper, Ga. Wells will be doing a presentation about trees that are sometimes called Indian Trail Trees or Marker Trees.

Native Americans often bent trees to mark trails, point to water, shelter, stream crossings, graves and sacred sites.

It is likely that a few of these trees may still exist in Bradley County.

Wells researched the Indian trees for five years working with the Eastern Band of Cherokees and others.

The presentation will include videos of elders discussing the significant of these trees. Wells has written a book titled “Mystery of the Trees,” which will be available at the meeting.

The Bradley County Historical and Genealogical Society meets quarterly in January, April, July and November.

The mission of the group is to encourage preservation of local history and genealogy.

The group participates in annual projects such as the Fort Hill Cemetery tour that are conducted each fall and the Historical Tour of Homes that takes place each April.

The group has hosted the Cherokee Nation History Course and recently provided funding for the Caney Creek Village documentary.

Bryan Reed is currently serving as the president of the organization.