Adding more color to a colorful career
by DELANEY WALKER
Jun 06, 2012 | 929 views | 0 0 comments | 6 6 recommendations | email to a friend | print
CREATIVITY is on full display as Myriam Rutland stands before her paintings at the Southern Comfort Furniture Store in Bradley Square Mall. Said Rutland, “My self-portrait would be as happy and as cheerful and as loving life as I could make it. That is what I try to do — just love my life regardless of where I am. It’s a gift and I can’t waste it.” Above, Rutland works on a painting for a private party at the Create and Celebrate studio in Cleveland.
CREATIVITY is on full display as Myriam Rutland stands before her paintings at the Southern Comfort Furniture Store in Bradley Square Mall. Said Rutland, “My self-portrait would be as happy and as cheerful and as loving life as I could make it. That is what I try to do — just love my life regardless of where I am. It’s a gift and I can’t waste it.” Above, Rutland works on a painting for a private party at the Create and Celebrate studio in Cleveland.
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ARTIST MYRIAM RUTLAND said she enjoys teaching private painting parties at the Create and Celebrate studio in Cleveland.
ARTIST MYRIAM RUTLAND said she enjoys teaching private painting parties at the Create and Celebrate studio in Cleveland.
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All the surprises and colors of life are a constant inspiration for Myriam Diaz Rutland, a local artist whose growing talent is only matched by her far-reaching dreams and goals.

“So art and writing and music — all of that is my passion,” Rutland explained. “They are what makes me who I am. They continuously make me want to dive into them and explore those things.”

Exploring ‘those things’ has landed Rutland a job with Cleveland’s own Create and Celebrate Studio off Georgetown Road. The local studio is a “painting party” where customers complete a piece of art while receiving step-by-step instructions.

“Its an opportunity to explore and grow as an artist. I am taking that step from being an artist on my own time and terms to trying to teach someone the art,” Rutland said. “I think it really makes you focus on the techniques that you use as an artist. Then you have to figure out how you convey that. How do I make someone else understand how to hold the brush and make the colors work?”

Far from being intimidated, Rutland chooses to see the challenge as a journey. Her attitude is a product of her passionate and responsible nature.

“My mother was one of 15 kids and they had a very humble background. I see what she and her brothers were able to achieve from those beginnings and it makes me want to work hard. I don’t want the sacrifices my mom made for me to ever go to waste,” Rutland shared. “I want to make her proud.”

Rutland’s drive is more than familial obligation or loyalty. The 25-year-old Puerto Rico native is encouraged by an inner need to succeed.

“I want to be the best that I can be in whatever I do. I think that I am very blessed and I am humbled by it because I do have many talents. I don’t want people to think I have a big head because of that,” Rutland said. “I am very blessed. I don’t want to be the lazy one that never did anything with her talents and just let them go.”

These feelings have urged Rutland to continue to grow her artistic abilities. Currently, her artwork is being sold at two different locations in Cleveland.

“I have prints and originals at the Southern Comfort Furniture Store in the [Bradley Square] mall and prints at Red Ribbon downtown,” Rutland said. “It would be awesome to see this continue to grow.”

Rutland added, “Getting commissions is the coolest thing in the world because people like what you do and want to see more.”

The talent seen in Rutland’s paintings is a family legacy.

“There has always been that ‘artistic-ness’ in the family. We have artists, we have poets, we have a little bit of everything. It’s part of life itself: art; music,” Rutland explained. “I guess you could say, I feel like it is what I was created to do.”

Family get-togethers often led to bonding over music. Rutland’s uncle would get out his guitar and the family would make up silly songs. These are memories that Rutland hopes she can one day make with her future children.

“I definitely hope my children have the artistic genes,” Rutland said. “It is fine if they do not, but if my kids want to pursue the finer arts then it is something that I will support wholeheartedly. A lot of times art is an outlet for so much. You can relax in a way that you can’t in anything else.”

June marks the one-year anniversary of her marriage to her husband, Reece. As with this special occasion, Rutland is looking forward to more milestones.

“I am hoping for a recording project within the next month or year,” Rutland revealed. “It will require a lot of research and a lot of commitment from many people to help make it a reality.”

This desire for a recording goes beyond fanfare and seeing her name in lights. The fact is Rutland is actually quite stage shy.

“It’s just wanting to do something with a gift. Wanting to be able to say, ‘I wrote my songs, I wrote my melody and I stuck with it. I got people to get together to work on a track.’ That would be the culmination of a journey that I know I would learn so much from,” Rutland explained.

A recording opportunity calls for hours of research and commitment from many people to make it a reality. It would be Rutland’s ‘biggest dream come reality.’ She is fighting for the opportunity and the future is looking bright and hopeful. And yet, Rutland said there is still room for more goals.

“I would love to have some of my poetry published,” Rutland said with a smile. “It would be great to have my work on a bookshelf or even on a Kindle.”

Rutland began writing poetry in high school. She admits that those pieces, ‘were not very good.’ Later, creative writing courses in college would spark an interest in her to write about life.

“I feel like there are many moments in life where people just walk by and let escape when so many moments are worth writing about,” Rutland said. “If you take the time to write about them, then you can explore your thoughts about that moment and how it affected you. Both as a person and as an artist.”

Today, Rutland’s poetry varies from fun pieces about love to deep and personal reflections.

“There are writings where you get a lot of me; very raw emotions,” Rutland said. “I think it’s kind of scary to put that much of yourself out there. I would hope for a good reaction and just see where it goes.”

With so many goals it is a wonder how Rutland plans on accomplishing them all in one lifetime.

“I try very hard to live in the present, but plan for the future. You have to be able to have your play time here in the present and goof off. But, I think it is very important to have a plan A, B, and C,” Rutland said.

Gestures and laughter are incorporated into everything Rutland talks about. A serious look comes across her face as she suggests ways to accomplish goals.

“Just take it one day at a time,” Rutland said. “If I have a huge goal then I divide it up into steps. What do I need to do to reach the first step? What do I need to do to reach the second step? Have checkups and see what is and isn’t working.”

Sometimes even the best laid plans do not work out.

“You can’t control every situation. Life will throw you a curve ball and you will end up in that less-than-desirable place. If you end up in that place, just suck it up, man it. It can always be worse,” Rutland encouraged.

Rutland said that sometimes she needs more help than she can find in herself.

“I grew up in the church, so when my personal strength is gone, that is when I reach for God. I tell him, ‘God, I can’t do this anymore.’ And he shows up and helps me out.”

People, Rutland explained, can also protect against those ‘less-than-desirable’ places.

“Find someone that you can be open with and don’t be scared to open yourself to others,” Rutland said speaking from experience. “Sometimes people will hurt you, but sometimes they will surprise you and you could make the best friend of your life.”

According to Rutland, the trying, pushing, and experimenting are all part of the process.

“It is in part where it’s going, but it’s more where am I now in the experience and how do I cope with whatever is going on and how do I bend myself,” she explained.

Rutland, who works in the advertising department at the Cleveland Daily Banner, is pursuing all three of her gifts with high hopes. She encourages others to do the same in their lives, as well.

“My job is great and it pays the bills, but your passions are what really define you,” Rutland said.

To keep up-to-date on Rutland’s artistic endeavors, visit her Facebook page Zaid Artist Studio or website, http://zaidartiststudio.weebly.com.