Bachman students learn about water quality monitoring
Sep 22, 2013 | 626 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Bachman Academy science teacher Juanita Pickeral  explains the World Water Monitoring Challenge results to student Alexis Bates.
Bachman Academy science teacher Juanita Pickeral explains the World Water Monitoring Challenge results to student Alexis Bates.
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More and more, students are leading the efforts to protect their local environment.

Living in a world shrunken by technology, they have a better understanding of the interdependence of important natural resources in a larger, global setting.

Students of Bachman Academy demonstrated this leadership and built upon their own knowledge Wednesday as they participated in water quality monitoring of Brymer Creek, Bachman Lake, and Johnston Woods Lake in McDonald.

With an easy-to-use test kit, students sampled the waterway for four basic indicators of water quality— dissolved oxygen, pH (acidity), temperature and turbidity (clarity).

“Our students learn a great deal by participating in the World Water Monitoring Challenge,” says Mark Frizzell, Bachman Academy headmaster. “Not only do they get valuable hands-on experience in science, but they are also learning life lessons about environmental stewardship and the importance of taking personal responsibility for their natural resources.”

The monitoring activities were part of a broader initiative called the World Water Monitoring Challenge. Since 2002, youth around the world have engaged in monitoring their local waterbodies and sharing their findings through the WWMC database.

Taking place annually from March 22 until Dec. 31, WWMC presents an important opportunity for young people around the world to become involved in safeguarding natural resources on a local, national and international scale.

Students learn more about the watersheds in which they live, how watersheds work, and how protecting their waters can have beneficial impacts downstream. Teachers and students often use their data to discuss impacts in their local watershed and compare their findings with others.

The Water Environment Federation and the International Water Association serve as the primary coordinators for the program. A complete list of sponsors and partners is found on the program Web site.

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www.MonitorWater.org.

www.BachmanAcademy.org.