Belinda Lloyd discusses quilting at DAR meeting
Sep 15, 2013 | 789 views | 0 0 comments | 23 23 recommendations | email to a friend | print
DAR Ocoee
The Ocoee Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution held its September meeting at the Elks Lodge recently with Regent Mariann Dietrich presiding. Vice Regent Laura Boyd introduced her mother and program speaker, Belinda Lloyd, whose topic was the “History of Quilting.” Mrs. Lloyd is a talented and prolific quilter, and displayed splendid examples of her own beautiful, artistic creations.  From left are hostess Gussie Ridgeway, Lloyd, Boyd, Dietrich, and hostess Helen Riden.
view slideshow (3 images)
The Ocoee Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution held its September meeting at the Elks Lodge recently with Regent Mariann Dietrich presiding.

Dietrich welcomed guests and introduced new member Lollie Bekkevold, whose third great-grandmother was Mrs. J.H. Hardwick, organizing regent and founder of the Ocoee Chapter in 1909.

Janice Dugan was welcomed as a new transfer member from a Sarasota, Fla., chapter.

Vice Regent Laura Boyd introduced her mother and program speaker, Belinda Lloyd, whose topic was the “History of Quilting.” Lloyd is retired from teaching school in Hamilton County.

She has been quilting for more than 30 years and teaching quilting classes for more than 15 years. She grew up in the eastern tip of Virginia watching her mother, grandmother, and great-grandmother quilt.

Mrs. Lloyd is a talented and prolific quilter, and displayed splendid examples of her own beautiful, artistic creations. The intricate designs and hand-stitching amazed members and guests.

She explained that quilting can be traced back to ancient Egypt and China. In Europe, quilting was introduced in the 12th century as a quilted garment worn under armor.

In the 18th and 19th centuries in America, most women were busy spinning, weaving, and sewing clothes for their families, so only the wealthy had the leisure time for quilting.

During the business session of the meeting, Joy Harden gave the American Indian report. Gussie Ridgeway read the minutes of the previous meeting.

Maggie Evans reported on the progress of the quilt project which will provide each resident of the future Bradley County Veterans’ Home with a lap quilt.

Conservation Chairman Ann Cherry reminded members and guests that each of us is the custodian of our family’s heritage. Family heritage is important because it is also the heritage of our country. Each family’s history is a small piece of our country’s history.

Jeannine Scott gave the National Defense Message which focused on the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s suggestions for Emergency Preparedness.

FEMA advises each household to build a disaster supply kit on which to subsist for at least three days, and the kit should be ready to take with you at a moment’s notice in case of evacuation.

Recommended supplies to include in a disaster supply kit are water, food, battery powered radio and extra batteries, flashlights, first aid kit, whistle to signal for help, moist towelettes, wrench or pliers, manual can opener, plastic sheeting and duct tape for shelter, garbage bags, antibiotic ointment and any unique family needs such as prescription medications.

FEMA also recommends that we create a plan to shelter-in-place, a plan to get away if needed, and a plan to communicate with family members if separated.

Nancy Quinn enlightened the group on the rich history of the Octagon house in Washington, D.C., where President James Madison and his wife, Dolly, lived for a brief period in 1814-15 after the British had burned a path through the city.

The president signed the Treaty of Ghent, which officially ended the War of 1812, while staying at the Octagon.

Chaplain Harriett Caldwell reported that member Betty Proffitt had died, and a moment of silence was observed in Mrs. Proffitt’s memory.

Caldwell also reminded members that Constitution Week Observance is Sept. 16-22.

Laura Boyd distributed new chapter yearbooks.

Dietrich thanked the hostesses, Laura Boyd, Helen Riden and Gussie Ridgeway, before adjourning the meeting.