Local youth to sing ‘911 song’ on worldwide broadcast
by WILLIAM WRIGHT Lifestyles Editor
Nov 17, 2013 | 1447 views | 0 0 comments | 92 92 recommendations | email to a friend | print
TASIA ROBERTS, 11, and T. Hernandez posed together after she recorded his original song “Daddy Come Home” in the studio of radio host Bill Rainey (inset). The song is a memorial to 911. Banner photo, WILLIAM WRIGHT
TASIA ROBERTS, 11, and T. Hernandez posed together after she recorded his original song “Daddy Come Home” in the studio of radio host Bill Rainey (inset). The song is a memorial to 911. Banner photo, WILLIAM WRIGHT
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TASIA ROBERTS, 11, and T. Hernandez posed together after she recorded his original song “Daddy Come Home” in the studio of radio host Bill Rainey. The song is a memorial to 911. Banner photo, WILLIAM WRIGHT
TASIA ROBERTS, 11, and T. Hernandez posed together after she recorded his original song “Daddy Come Home” in the studio of radio host Bill Rainey. The song is a memorial to 911. Banner photo, WILLIAM WRIGHT
slideshow
Tasia Roberts, an 11-year-old Cleveland native, was chosen to sing a new song written by local songwriter T. Hernandez, called “Daddy Come Home,” which will have a worldwide broadcast on the Internet radio station NBRN.FM.

According to Hernandez, it will debut in 197 countries to millions of listeners tuning in to “The Bill Rainey Show” on Monday, and airing from noon to 1 p.m. It can also be heard during his show on Wednesdays and Fridays at the same time. A video is planned to follow the song later in the year.

“Basically it’s about 911 — originally it was called The Fireman’s Song,” said T. Hernandez, an Apache Indian who writes country-Western songs. “We’re paying tribute to 911 because we don’t want anyone to forget what happened. The song is versatile because it can fit almost any situation. It can apply to anyone who loses someone close to them.”

When asked about the decision to go with a new, younger talent instead of a seasoned veteran, Hernandez explained, “Bill and I decided to give someone a shot at that ‘golden ring,’ and Tasia took it. She did a wonderful job!”

Although the song was written closer to the 911 attack, Hernandez said it took time to find the right combination of producers, musicians and the voice that could do his song justice to his satisfaction.

“This is a very powerful song, sung by an 11-year-old with a very powerful voice,” Hernandez said. “Just hearing these words — I’m sure it will touch people’s hearts and someone may pick this song up and want to do it.”

Hernandez, who served in the U.S. Army and later as an Illinois state trooper and Texas deputy sheriff, said the song is very personal to him because 911 affects the lives of so many people. He added it should never be forgotten, but rather immortalized in song as a reminder for all time.

Tasia, who is home-schooled with her two sisters, said, “I am so happy to get to have this experience! It’s been fun.”

“This song has been with me for a long time,” Hernandez said. “It’s time the world heard it.”