More rain, colder temps and snow?
by GREG KAYLOR, Banner Staff Writer
Jan 17, 2013 | 1043 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
MORE RAIN IS FORECAST in the Cleveland and Bradley County area today, but this time meteorologists say it might be bringing a friend — snow. Some say a dusting. Some say an inch. Some say, “Let’s just wait and see.” Here, rainwater puddles earlier this week in a yard on Georgetown Road. Banner photo, DONNA KAYLOR
MORE RAIN IS FORECAST in the Cleveland and Bradley County area today, but this time meteorologists say it might be bringing a friend — snow. Some say a dusting. Some say an inch. Some say, “Let’s just wait and see.” Here, rainwater puddles earlier this week in a yard on Georgetown Road. Banner photo, DONNA KAYLOR
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Flooding has been a concern during the past few days but now a threat of snow or ice has entered the forecast for southern and northeastern Tennessee.

During a National Weather Service briefing Wednesday afternoon, forecasters were confident up to 10 inches of snow will fall in the mountainous highest elevations.

“It is uncertain in Bradley County whether we will have snowfall or a significant event, according to NWS,” said Jerry Johnson Jr., of Cleveland-Bradley County Emergency Management Agency.

NWS Meteorologist Anthony Cavallucci informed emergency managers in Southeast Tennessee that temperatures should hover around 37 or 38 degrees as moisture continues to fall.

“A few years ago, we were in the same temperature range and some areas of Bradley County got 3 to 5 inches of snowfall in a short period of time. We were the only community to call for an early dismissal of schools that day,” Johnson said.

According to Cavallucci, the system is traveling across Texas into Alabama and tracking toward Atlanta today.

“As it pulls cold air, it could change into snow,” Cavallucci said.

He added that any snowfall in the region would be a “heavy, wet snow.”

Icing conditions could occur in the middle and western portions of the state.

Cavallucci said snow will most likely fall and stick at elevations of 3,500 feet or higher.

He also indicated a NWS Flood Watch will continue and rivers will continue to rise through Friday.

Johnson said with all the rain which has fallen since Sunday, black ice could be an issue as temperatures drop and water seeps onto roadways.

“We are continuing to keep up with the changing weather conditions and monitoring all conditions in the region,” Johnson said.

Tennessee Emergency Management Agency is continuing the Declaration of State Emergency due to flooding, possible icing and snowy conditions.

According to today’s NWS forecast, an 80 percent chance of precipitation is expected today.

The forecast calls for snow to begin in the Bradley County area around 9 p.m.

Temperatures are projected to be 35 degrees and continuing to fall to 26 degrees overnight. Blustery conditions are expected as winds from the north between 10-15 mph move the system northeasterly.

CBCEMA officials encourage residents to monitor conditions throughout the day and evening hours.

“Black ice could cause problems Friday morning for commuters,” Johnson said.

Drivers should monitor media reports concerning conditions, according to Johnson.