Terminal expected to be completed by Dec. 12
by By DAVID DAVIS Managing Editor
Nov 18, 2012 | 1533 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Cleveland Regional Jetport is nearing completion and expects to have a grand opening in January. The 8,000- square-foot terminal building at 251 Dry Valley Road N.E., should be complete and ready for occupancy on Dec. 12. Banner photo, DAVID DAVIS
Cleveland Regional Jetport is nearing completion and expects to have a grand opening in January. The 8,000- square-foot terminal building at 251 Dry Valley Road N.E., should be complete and ready for occupancy on Dec. 12. Banner photo, DAVID DAVIS
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The Cleveland Municipal Airport adjourned from its meeting Friday without deciding on which management structure would be best to operate Cleveland Regional Jetport when it opens in early January 2013.

The five-member panel did agree to accept a personal letter of credit, instead of a construction performance bond on hangars costing less than $100,000.

That decision was made after Dr. Tim Viser said he was motivated to build a hangar, but he would not pay an additional $20,000 for a construction bond.

The airport authority left in place the requirement making hangar owners pay for soil tests.

CMAA members remain undecided on a manager and three part-time employees, a manager and fixed-based operator or a hybrid of the two. The discussion was essentially a continuation from the one in October.

The airport authority will reconvene the adjourned meeting at 9 a.m. on Dec. 3 to make a decision.

Ronnie Fitzgerald, of PDC Consultants, reported Hinkle Contracting Co., of Paris, Ky., finished pouring concrete Thursday. So far, about 123,800 square yards is in place. Local concrete will be used in remaining areas such as the pad for a fuel truck and hangars. Cleveland Regional Jetport is Hinkle’s last job before it becomes a regional platform of Summit Materials.

“Sometime the week after Thanksgiving, the marking people will come in and it will begin looking like a real airport,” he said.

Wright Brothers Construction Inc. is hauling in topsoil and dressing the edges around the concrete work as Guardian Electric installs the airport lighting.

“Those two companies out there, it’s almost like a dance the way they are moving around over the airport,” he said.

All of the runway lighting will be LEDs, which should save on energy and maintenance costs over incandescent or quartz lighting because of longer meantime between failure.

“You will have the first airport in the state of Tennessee that is totally LED,” Fitzgerald said.

Construction of the terminal building is still on track. Dec. 12 is the target date for completing the punch list, the same day the furnishings arrive.

He said the airport will open in January, but the T-hangars will not be ready for occupancy until May or June.

In other discussion, Lou Patten reported a commitment of a $75,000 donation toward construction of the terminal building. He is not at liberty to divulge the company’s name until it receives approval from the board of directors. The donation brings the total to about $290,000.

“When this terminal building is completed and people come in and see it, it’s going to knock their socks off,” Patten said.

“It’s going to be really nice. There are going to be a lot of people who will want to have meetings out there.”

He suggested setting rental rates for the corporate conference center and other meeting rooms.

The airport authority also discussed auctioning the first official flight in or flight out.