City Schools educators receive 'gifted' training

By KRISTEN HART

Posted 11/9/17

Educators with Cleveland City Schools have been receiving

training on how to better teach students deemed intellectually "gifted." Director of Special Populations Dr. Joy Hudson spoke to the …

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City Schools educators receive 'gifted' training

Posted

Educators with Cleveland City Schools have been receiving training on how to better teach students deemed intellectually "gifted."

 Director of Special Populations Dr. Joy Hudson spoke to the Cleveland Board of Education recently about the district’s participation in the Tennessee Gifted Programming Consortium.

The district was one of 40 applying to become part of the consortium, and was selected for the 2017-18 school year. 

Hudson said leaders with the city schools will receive training three times this school year, and have already met twice. Those participating in the training are psychologists, service specialists, district directors and supervisors, RTI coordinators and instructional coaches.

“They said that what we hope from this is that the coaches will come back and train the teachers on what to do, and how to identify strategies that they can use for students who are considered talented,” Hudson said.

Hudson said they are learning how to differentiate instruction in the general classroom for the gifted; identify students who are potentially intellectually gifted; and address any challenges these students may have.

“In the training, they explained how the gifted learners learn,” Hudson said. “They learn at a faster pace. They think a little bit deeper. They are problem solvers. So, how can we tap in on those students to keep them from getting lost?”

Hudson demonstrated for the board one of the exercises she participated in during the training. She presented a piece of paper where she had drawn a picture using the shapes already printed on the paper. She explained how a child might draw a picture might help educators determine whether a child is gifted or not. 

Tennessee is one of several states across the nation which include services for "Intellectually Gifted," under the category "Special Education." However, unlike services for students with disabilities, there is no federal funding specifically for gifted education. Hudson said that means this training is especially valuable. 

There are currently 48 students in the city schools who are categorized as "intellectually gifted," Hudson said. 

“So what does it mean to be gifted?” Hudson said. “That means that child has the built-in intellectual ability to be creative. They have potential for achievement that’s outstanding, and it has to have an educational impact on educational performance.”

 Hudson invited the board to attend an upcoming consortium training being held in Cleveland.


Inset Quote:

“In the training, they explained how the gifted learners learn. They learn at a faster pace. They think a little bit deeper. They are problem solvers. So, how can we tap in on those students to keep them from getting lost?” — Dr. Joy Hudson

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