Educators give state feedback

Special to the Banner
Posted 8/27/17

NASHVILLE — According to the 2017 Tennessee Educator Survey report released earlier this month, most Tennessee educators believe the evaluation process improves their teaching, and professional …

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Educators give state feedback

Posted

NASHVILLE — According to the 2017 Tennessee Educator Survey report released earlier this month, most Tennessee educators believe the evaluation process improves their teaching, and professional learning helps them meet student needs.

However, teachers also reported relatively few opportunities for professional learning and difficulties identifying and accessing high-quality instructional materials.

This is the seventh year the Tennessee Department of Education, with Vanderbilt University, has surveyed the state’s educators to gain insight and inform department strategy, policy decisions, and goal-setting.

“The educator survey provides a unique opportunity to learn from our most valuable partners: our educators who are with our students in schools and classrooms every day,” Tennessee Education Commissioner Candice McQueen said.

This year, more than 38,000 educators participated in the survey — more than half of all teachers and school administrators in the state and an overall increase of about 5,000 educators over last year.

Full survey results can be viewed online at http://educatorsurvey.tnk12.gov/.

Among the takeaways:

• In 2017, some 74 percent of educators say evaluation has led to improvements in their teaching, compared to 38 percent in 2012, the first year teacher evaluation was implemented in Tennessee.

• Teachers reported relatively few opportunities for personalized professional learning, but three-quarters of teachers say the professional learning they do receive enhances their abilities to meet students’ needs. Still, about half of teachers say they take part at least once a month in a professional learning activity they do not see as helpful.

• Tennessee teachers reported difficulties identifying and accessing high-quality instructional materials, with the average K-3 reading teacher spending 4.5 hours per week creating or sourcing materials.

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