Crossover

Lee Students share food, love of Jesus

By KRISTEN HART

Posted 10/2/17

By KRISTEN?HART?

Banner Intern

Crossover, a community service effort led by Lee University students, has continued to help the Cleveland community since being established over 10 years ago.

Every Saturday at 10 a.m., students gather in Lee’s Leonard Center parking lot to go out into the community to deliver food and spend a couple of hours with those they visit.

“On Saturday morning, when students are typically sleeping in, these students are out making a difference consistently,” said Dr. William Lamb, director of the Leonard Center.

Crossover is primarily a student-led Lee club that was officially established in 2006 by a couple of students. They were originally inspired by their teacher, Lamb, who had brought one of them along one Saturday as he delivered food to people in the community.

“Crossover is designed by student leaders,” Lamb said. “The intent was to be relational based. To get to know people in the community.”

After the students began to create Crossover, they made it more regular and met every Saturday to go out and deliver food. However, Tray Manor, a student leader for Crossover, pointed out that isn’t the main goal.

“Our tagline is, ‘Building the Kingdom of God through relationships,’”?Manor said. “So we take food, and that’s super cool because it gets our foot in the door, but the main reason we’re there is just to love on people, to share Jesus with them and be a constant source of love and encouragement.”

The name Crossover comes from the literal act of crossing over the railroad tracks into the other side of town. Students visit areas where there are likely to be people in need.

Student leader Oscar Palin explained students gather around to pray before going out and help any newcomers find a route they can join. There are multiple Crossover routes, all named after the streets included in them. They visit neighborhoods as well as apartment complexes and people who do not have homes.

“While a lot of our neighborhoods are near Lee, some of them are a little bit farther away,” Palin said. “The need in Cleveland is wide-reaching.”

The food students give away is provided through donations from the community and hunger relief organization Feeding America. Some of the food gathered is non-perishable, but students also give away fresh foods such as fruits, vegetables, bread, milk and occasionally sweets.

Manor said the students introduce themselves to the communities they visit by simply knocking on doors and asking if each household needs help with anything. Students will give their boxes of food to those in need of them, but they have been known to do other things to help. Some students involved in the ministry say they have built friendships with those they have visited.

“Not everyone is welcoming,” Manor said. “But most people either say, ‘No, I’m good,’ or are very welcoming.”

Since it has been going strong for more than 10 years, Crossover is now an established effort that continues to attract new students every year.

Student Marybeth Scheibel is one such newcomer to Crossover who just started participating this fall semester.

“I am really passionate about serving,” Scheibel said. “After hearing about what Crossover did, and just the opportunity to go meet people and establish real relationships seemed like a really cool opportunity to me.”

The students will spend up to three or four hours in the community each Saturday. Lee does have a service learning requirement where students must complete 10 hours of service each semester, but Lamb said many who are involved in Crossover serve beyond those required hours.

“It began for some as a requirement,” Lamb said. “But it moved from a requirement for service to more of a friendship.”

Palin has been with Crossover since he was a freshman and will be graduating this year. Student leaders help to prepare other students in Crossover who will take over as the leaders once seniors graduate, ensuring it will remain a tradition for years to come.

“We’re very welcoming people,” Palin said. “We just want to get to know people and love them. That’s what we’re all about — loving our community.”

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Crossover

Lee Students share food, love of Jesus

Posted


Crossover, a community service effort led by Lee University students, has continued to help the Cleveland community since being established over 10 years ago.

Every Saturday at 10 a.m., students gather in Lee’s Leonard Center parking lot to go out into the community to deliver food and spend a couple of hours with those they visit.

“On Saturday morning, when students are typically sleeping in, these students are out making a difference consistently,” said Dr. William Lamb, director of the Leonard Center.

Crossover is primarily a student-led Lee club that was officially established in 2006 by a couple of students. They were originally inspired by their teacher, Lamb, who had brought one of them along one Saturday as he delivered food to people in the community.

“Crossover is designed by student leaders,” Lamb said. “The intent was to be relational based. To get to know people in the community.”
After the students began to create Crossover, they made it more regular and met every Saturday to go out and deliver food. However, Tray Manor, a student leader for Crossover, pointed out that isn’t the main goal.
“Our tagline is, ‘Building the Kingdom of God through relationships,’”?Manor said. “So we take food, and that’s super cool because it gets our foot in the door, but the main reason we’re there is just to love on people, to share Jesus with them and be a constant source of love and encouragement.”
The name Crossover comes from the literal act of crossing over the railroad tracks into the other side of town. Students visit areas where there are likely to be people in need.

Student leader Oscar Palin explained students gather around to pray before going out and help any newcomers find a route they can join. There are multiple Crossover routes, all named after the streets included in them. They visit neighborhoods as well as apartment complexes and people who do not have homes.

“While a lot of our neighborhoods are near Lee, some of them are a little bit farther away,” Palin said. “The need in Cleveland is wide-reaching.”
The food students give away is provided through donations from the community and hunger relief organization Feeding America. Some of the food gathered is non-perishable, but students also give away fresh foods such as fruits, vegetables, bread, milk and occasionally sweets.

Manor said the students introduce themselves to the communities they visit by simply knocking on doors and asking if each household needs help with anything. Students will give their boxes of food to those in need of them, but they have been known to do other things to help. Some students involved in the ministry say they have built friendships with those they have visited.
“Not everyone is welcoming,” Manor said. “But most people either say, ‘No, I’m good,’ or are very welcoming.”

Since it has been going strong for more than 10 years, Crossover is now an established effort that continues to attract new students every year.
Student Marybeth Scheibel is one such newcomer to Crossover who just started participating this fall semester.

“I am really passionate about serving,” Scheibel said. “After hearing about what Crossover did, and just the opportunity to go meet people and establish real relationships seemed like a really cool opportunity to me.”

The students will spend up to three or four hours in the community each Saturday. Lee does have a service learning requirement where students must complete 10 hours of service each semester, but Lamb said many who are involved in Crossover serve beyond those required hours.

“It began for some as a requirement,” Lamb said. “But it moved from a requirement for service to more of a friendship.”

Palin has been with Crossover since he was a freshman and will be graduating this year. Student leaders help to prepare other students in Crossover who will take over as the leaders once seniors graduate, ensuring it will remain a tradition for years to come.

“We’re very welcoming people,” Palin said. “We just want to get to know people and love them. That’s what we’re all about — loving our community.”

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