Mayor endorses 'Safer at Home' plan

By RICK NORTON
Posted 4/1/20

Cleveland Mayor Kevin Brooks on Tuesday endorsed Gov. Bill Lee’s “Safer at Home” executive orders, and urged all local residents to comply with the full set of explicit guidelines.Both orders …

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Mayor endorses 'Safer at Home' plan

CLEVELAND MAYOR KEVIN BROOKS is seen at the  local press conference in which officials confirmed the first case of COVID-19 in Bradley County. Most recently, Brooks has endorsed Gov. Bill Lee's "Safer at Home" executive order which adds a little more teeth to restrictions during the current health crisis.
CLEVELAND MAYOR KEVIN BROOKS is seen at the local press conference in which officials confirmed the first case of COVID-19 in Bradley County. Most recently, Brooks has endorsed Gov. Bill Lee's "Safer at Home" executive order which adds a little more teeth to restrictions during the current health crisis.
Banner file photo, DANIEL GUY
Posted
Cleveland Mayor Kevin Brooks on Tuesday endorsed Gov. Bill Lee’s “Safer at Home” executive orders, and urged all local residents to comply with the full set of explicit guidelines.
 
Both orders — which define “essential” and “nonessential” services — came late Monday in Lee’s daily media briefing. They took effect Tuesday night at 11:59 p.m., and will continue through April 14.
 
Labeled as Executive Order No. 21 and Executive Order No. 22, the directives will “… further mitigate the spread of COVID-19,” Brooks explained in a detailed statement to the Cleveland Daily Banner that includes the entire listing of businesses and services that are considered “essential” based on Lee’s guidelines.
 
Due to its length, the full listing will not be published in this news story; however, it is available in its entire form — as forwarded by Brooks — on the Cleveland Daily Banner website at www.clevelandbanner.com.
 
“Gov. Lee took another important step to stop the spread of the COVID-19 virus,” Brooks said. “The city of Cleveland will work hand-in-hand with state authorities as the state enforces these new executive orders.”
 
Brooks added, “The Cleveland City Council and I are imploring city of Cleveland residents to ‘Stay at Home’ if you can. This is very serious, and we need to do everything we can as friends and family to social distance, and stop the spread of this virus.”
 
Brooks repeated past municipal recommendations and wrapped them around Lee’s presentation to news media outlets during Monday’s briefing.
 
“We need people to consider working from home, if possible, participating in only necessary essential traveling, sanitizing frequently, and keeping a safe distance from others,” he stressed. “This will be challenging, but these measures will shorten the time we will need to confront this virus.”
 
Brooks detailed the governor’s latest executive orders:
 
• Executive Order 21: “… This will close any businesses or organizations that perform close-contact person services, and entertainment and recreational business venues. These include, but not limited to, hair salons, barber shops, bowling alleys, night clubs, theaters and skating rinks.”
 
• Executive Order 22: “… This urges residents to ‘Stay Home,’ except for when engaging in Essential Activity and Essential Services.”
 
This entire list of “Essential Activity and Essential Services” is accessible on the Banner website.
 
Essential services
includes long list
 
The list includes a variety of categories that are considered to be “essential,” and therefore may continue to operate as long as they comply with social-distancing and other health guidelines (such as crowd size; less than 10 people) so handed down through the governor’s previous executive orders. 
 
It includes (all of which are considered “essential”):
 
• Health care and public health operations;
 
• Human services operations;
 
• Essential infrastructure operations;
 
• Essential government functions;
 
• Food and medicine stores;
 
• Food and beverage production and agriculture;
 
• Organizations that provide charitable and social services;
 
• Religious and ceremonial functions;
 
• Media;
 
• Gas stations and businesses needed for transportation;
 
• Financial institutions and insurance entities;
 
• Critical trades;
 
• Mail, post, shipping, logistics, delivery and pick-up services;
 
• Educational institutions;
 
• Laundry services;
 
• Supplies to work from home;
 
• Supplies for essential businesses and operations;
 
• Transportation;
 
• Home-based care and services;
 
• Residential facilities and shelters;
 
• Professional services;
 
• Manufacturing, distribution and supply chain for critical products and industries;
 
• Hotels and motels;
 
• Funeral services; and
 
• Other.
 
As a reminder, Brooks also referred to the governor’s Executive Order No. 17 which “… prohibits social gatherings of 10 or more people and also enacts the following provisions regarding restaurants, bars, and similar food and drink establishments …”
 
These include:
 
• Establishments are to exclusively offer drive-thru, takeout or delivery options to support families, businesses and the food supply chain during this emergency.
 
• Establishments may sell alcohol by takeout or delivery (with the purchase of food) in closed containers to those who are age 21 and up.
 
• Gyms and fitness/exercise centers or substantially similar facilities are to temporarily close and suspend in-person services. In the meantime, these businesses are encouraged to pursue digital programming, if possible.
 
Executive Order No. 17 also pursues additional measures to keep vulnerable populations such as the elderly and those with underlying conditions safe:
 
• Visitation to nursing homes, retirement homes, and long-term care or assisted-living facilities is now limited to visits involving essential care only.
 
• Businesses are encouraged to enact policies that take extra steps to assist vulnerable populations by considering measures such as shopping hours exclusive from the general public.
 
Accepted reasons
for leaving home
 
In his statement, Brooks referred to the limited number of reasons why residents should leave their homes. He said it is an exclusive list, and one that should be taken seriously:
 
• Going to the grocery, convenience or warehouse store.
 
• Going to the pharmacy to pick up medications and other healthcare necessities.
 
• Going to medical appointments (check with your doctor or provider first).
 
• Going to restaurants for takeout, delivery or drive-thru.
 
• Caring for, or supporting, a friend or family member.
 
• Taking a walk, riding your bike, hiking, jogging and enjoying nature for exercise; just keep six feet apart.
 
• Walking with your pets and taking them to the veterinarian, if necessary.
 
• Helping someone to get necessary supplies.
 
• Receiving deliveries from any business which delivers.
 
• In short, only trips such as gas, post office, delivery, sanitation, waste, energy, water and legal services are all considered essential.
 
By contrast, a list of things Tennessee residents — including Cleveland and Bradley County — should not do includes:
 
• NOT going to work unless you are a providing essential services or it is absolutely necessary.
 
• NOT visiting friends and family if there is no urgent need.
 
• NOT visiting loved ones in the hospital, nursing home, skilled nursing facility or other residential care facility, except for limited exceptions.
 
Inset Teaser:
 
'Essential' services list
 
 

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