This Week in History

Posted 6/17/18

A representative of Red Food Stores Inc. of Chattanooga told the city commissioners Monday that a site has been chosen in the Cleveland area to replace the store that burned down nearly two years ago. Don Jones told the commissioners during the weekly luncheon meeting that the proposed location for the new Red Food development was the intersection of Waterlevel Highway and Durkee Road. This location would replace the store that was previously located on Central Avenue. Jones told the gathering that an option had been taken on the land, and that his company felt this location would best serve the needs of East Cleveland and Waterlevel Highway area residents. The new location would be the fourth Red Food Store to operate in Cleveland, joining other stores located on Keith Street, 25th Street, and Spring Place Road. Jones told the commissioners, however, that a major problem concerning sewer service for the proposed site existed, and that his company was interest in joining the city and the Bradley County Board of Education in a joint project to supply such service to the area.

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This Week in History

Posted

1975

A representative of Red Food Stores Inc. of Chattanooga told the city commissioners Monday that a site has been chosen in the Cleveland area to replace the store that burned down nearly two years ago.

Don Jones told the commissioners during the weekly luncheon meeting that the proposed location for the new Red Food development was the intersection of Waterlevel Highway and Durkee Road. This location would replace the store that was previously located on Central Avenue. Jones told the gathering that an option had been taken on the land, and that his company felt this location would best serve the needs of East Cleveland and Waterlevel Highway area residents.

The new location would be the fourth Red Food Store to operate in Cleveland, joining other stores located on Keith Street, 25th Street, and Spring Place Road. Jones told the commissioners, however, that a major problem concerning sewer service for the proposed site existed, and that his company was interest in joining the city and the Bradley County Board of Education in a joint project to supply such service to the area.

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Final preparations are being made this week for Sunday’s running of the Southeastern Demolition Derby Championship, an event sponsored by the Cleveland Jaycees.

More than 50 drivers, strapped in rattle-traps and road-hogs, are expected to enter the 2 p.m. race that will see a purse of $1,750 go to the top three finishers. The Cleveland Speedway, on South Lee Highway, has donated its facility for the running of the demolition derby, and all proceeds from the event will go toward securing a closed-circuit television scanner and monitor for the Bradley County Jail, to help curb escapes.

In this year’s running, local law enforcement officers are among the top contenders as they agreed last week to aid the Jaycees. Sheriff Lamar Lawson, City Police Chief Bernard Snyder, County Chief Deputy Elvis Brandon and Trooper David Morgan are the star attractions-and you can bet the 40-some-odd other entries in the race will be out to eliminate these men early in the contest.

John Brewer, Jaycees’ chairman for the derby, said that at least three and possibly four, heats will be run to determine the qualifiers for the featured heat-the one which will see three lucky drivers walk away with their pockets full of cash. The entry fee for drivers will be $5, while general admission has been set at $3.

Entries will be able to register for the event up to race time on Saturday afternoon. This is the fifth consecutive running of the Southeastern Derby, as the race was sponsored for four years by the Apison Lions Club. “We feel like this is a real worthwhile cause and hope that we’ll attract a large crowd,” said Brewer.

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The search of an area in Bradley County that was described by Sheriff Lamar Lawson as a “major drug area” continued Thursday, and hundreds of marijuana plants were confiscated by county officers. The sheriff, along with Detective Sgt. Robert Lawson and Detective Danny Chastain, resumed the search of the Chestuee Creek area, and more plants, some in excess of 8 feet, were found.

The sheriff said the “harvest” was so large that two vehicles had to be used to transport the illegal weed to the county jail. Also, the help of two trustees was needed to complete the “harvest.” There was more evidence found that some of the larger plants had been stripped of their lower leaves according to the officers, and that the missing leaves were large enough to be processed into “pot.”

The sheriff said that while his men are in the process of “harvesting” as many of the illicit plants as possible, his department is also busy gathering “hard evidence” concerning the growing and cultivation of marijuana in the county, and he said “arrests could come very soon.” The sheriff also expressed an invitation for any Bradley County citizen to stop by the sheriff’s department in the County Jail building and inspect the latest marijuana brought in by the officers.

“I hope that many citizens come by and see what it looks like, so that they will help my men be on the lookout for it. We will be glad to explain its features so that anyone could recognize it,” the sheriff said.

Sheriff Lawson also expressed his appreciation to the public for their aid thus far in locating marijuana beds, and he called for “the united efforts of all Bradley County residents in combating this ever growing problem.”

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The Cubs showed why they are unbeaten in Dixie Youth Baseball last night. They rolled to a 5-0 win over the Braves. Pitcher Mickey Shamblin hurled a masterful one-hitter in the win. Scrapiron Evans got the only hit off the hurling of Shamblin. Darren Kyle was the losing pitcher. He yielded a total of seven hits. Joe Swafford and Mickey Shamblin paced the Cubs hitting with two hits each. Swafford opened the contest with a double. Shamblin fanned a total of 12 Brave hitters.

The White Sox scored a big win over the Browns. The final totals read 8-2. Monte Williams was the winning hurler. He fanned a total of five Brown hitters. Ralph Davis was the losing Brown hurler. Joe Blackburn, Monte Williams and Terry Allen had two hits each for the winning Sox team. Jeff Whaley joined in with a big double.

The Barons whipped the Travelers by a score of 12-1. David Connally was the winning Baron hurler. Marty Catlett suffered the pitching defeat. Phil Carson, Jeff Carson and David Connally paced the Baron hitting with two hits each. Phil Carson started the contest with a double. Mike Haney had the only two hits off the hurling of Baron pitcher Connally. The Senators rolled past the Red Sox by a 10-7 margin. Randy Keith was the winning hurler while Hampton was charged with the defeat. Jeff Lovingood blasted a home run for the Senators. Jeff Howell followed with a pair of singles and Jerry Johnson added a single. For the Red Sox, Mason had two hits. Dintsch blasted a home run and Bradley posted a double. The Senators came up with 8 big runs in the 4 innings and the Red Sox could never catch up.

In Minor League action, the Colts rolled over the Padres by a 16-10 score and the Mets defeated the Pilots by a 7-4 margin. In North Bradley Dixie Youth action, the Indians whipped the Vols 17-7. The winning hurler was Jeff Wooden. Greg Hooper and Ernie Oyler paced the Indian hitting with a double and a single each. Mitch Collins rapped out a double while Tim Hobbs stroked a single. For the Vols, Mark Moore was the losing pitcher. Troy Hamilton blasted a double and a single and Mike Lyle joined in ———

During the regular monthly meeting of the Cleveland City Board of Education, final approval was given for the construction of a $39,000 wrestling-concession-restroom facility to be built at the football field at Cleveland High School. The board members voted their unanimous approval of the project, and of the financial arrangements, and the facility will become a reality if approved by the city commission at next Monday’s formal meeting.

City School Supt. Dr. Donald P. Yates explained that the project would require $26,000 in bond funds, $10,000 in budgeted capital outlay funds, and $3,000 raised by the Cleveland High School Booster Club. Yates told the board members that Mayor Harry Dethero had expressed the opinion that the project would receive the approval of the city commission at the June meeting.

Concerning the location of the proposed facility, Yates told the board that the “flood situation” had been thoroughly investigated by City Engineer Joe Edwards. According to Yates, Edwards found by checking records that the facility would have to be built “at least two feet about the present ground level,” and that current plans call for the ground level to be raised “4 feet, 2 inches” before construction begins. Yates said the plans will place the facility “at least two feet higher than the level required for the flood plain regulations.” Yates expressed his confidence in the proposed construction plans by telling the board “we’re home free.”

The board voted to direct Edwards and City Planner Fred Goodrow to actively assist Cleveland High School Industrial Arts Instructor William McBride in the duties of general contractor for the project. The board expressed their full confidence in McBride in his assignment as general contractor of the project, but they felt the city engineer and city planner should be called upon “to make sure all work meets the specifications agreed upon.” The board also expressed the opinion that the new building should “compliment” the other school buildings on the campus.

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“I’ll miss the whole thing, no doubt about it — the traditions, the students, the faculty, just all of it. But I look forward to having the finest college preparatory school we can possibly have.”

Those are the comments of Bill Schultz as he talked about leaving his job as principal at Bradley Central High School, a position he has held for the past 14 years. Schultz resigned at BCHS to become headmaster at Cleveland Day School.

Through the years, at the local high school, Schultz says he has seen changes in everything from dress habits to teaching methods. “Fourteen years ago girls couldn’t wear slacks to school. Now the teachers do,” he commented.

The administrator also said he has seen a transition in students as a whole explaining that today’s pupil is much more knowledgeable and capable than in the past. “Television in part has probably had a bearing on thi, and I think students today travel more, see more, do more and have opportunities to be involved in more activities,” he commented. The 30-year veteran of the education profession has also witnessed many changes in classroom teaching methods but he admits he’s “still a little old fashioned to an extent.”

Pointing out that some modern classrooms are equipped with teaching machines, reading machines, language labs and more audiovisual equipment, the principal said, “It wouldn’t be too hard for us to get away from reading, writing and arithmetic. I guess maybe I haven’t adopted some of the most progressive ideas in education as quickly as some because I believe the basics are still important,” he remarked.

Parents of students have not been exempt from change over the past decade, according to Schultz, who said today’s mothers and dads are more lenient. “I would have to say that parents today are more permissiv — -I being one of them,” he stated. “This is not necessarily always good but it’s not necessarily bad either. Of course, when parents don’t care it puts us in a bad situation. If you have help at home you can usually help a student but without it you are fighting a losing battle.”

While at the local high school, which is one of the largest in the state, Schultz was involved directly with students daily in addition to tending to his other duties such as discussing curriculum, scheduling, academic activities and co-curricular activities with faculty members. Being a principal, the Clevelander said, is a full time job “any way you look at it. I was involved with students directly every day and there was a long line waiting out there (the office) every day,” he said. “

There’s new and different situations daily and with the number of students at Bradley Central you have all kinds of people and situations. There’s a lot of satisfaction to be derived from the work.” The principal stressed his belief that good human relations are essential in helping a school to run smoothly and he said he always had intentions of being totally fair in dealing with people. Commenting on discipline in schools, Schultz says he tries to be “firm but fair.”

The administrator will be making some adjustments in his changeover from a large public school to a small private one, but he said he felt like the change is “the thing to do at the time.” “I am leaving Bradley Central in good faith with everyone I have been involved with,” he commented. Schultz will be assuming his duties as headmaster at CDS in early July.

The Clevelander said his love of sports helped kindle his own interest in the educational field and he added that he was a coach at the beginning of his teaching profession. “After teaching and coaching I had the opportunity to get started in administration,” he said. “After being in it a while I felt like it was what I wanted to do.”

When Schultz leaves his administration at Bradley Central High School this summer, he will be marking the end of the longest term ever held by a single principal in the history of the facility.

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Cleveland Police Commissioner Ralph Buckner offered a $1,000 reward for the return of a diamond setting that he lost from a ring last Saturday, police reports indicate. Buckner told Officer Eddie Scoggins that the diamond setting was lost around noon Saturday in the vicinity of 25th Street and Buckner Funeral Homes’ North Chapel on North Ocoee Street.

Buckner described the setting as measuring 3.15 carats, and having a value of $5,200. Any person finding the diamond is asked to contact the Cleveland Police Department as soon as possible.

In other police action Monday, Bradley County officers investigated the theft of a color console television from the office of the manager of the Green Acres Trailer Court, on South Lee Highway.

Deputy Terry Botts reported that the television, belonging to Beryle Thomas, was a 25 inch RCA color model. He said entry into the office was gained by breaking or prying a door open.

The theft apparently occurred between 9 p.m. Monday and 2 a.m. this morning. Botts indicated that a truck was probably used to transport the stolen item due to its size and weight. The investigation is continuing by county detectives.


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