Copperhill physician Adler indicted for illegally prescribing controlled substances
Nov 30, 2010 | 957 views | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
CHATTANOOGA — A federal grand jury in Chattanooga, returned an 85-count indictment Nov. 23 against Richard Adler, M.D., 69, of Copperhill, for illegally prescribing controlled substances.

Dr. Adler appeared in court on Monday before U.S. Magistrate Judge Susan K. Lee and entered a plea of not guilty to the charges in the indictment. He was released pending trial, but was ordered by the court as a condition of bond to not practice medicine. Trial has been set for Feb. 1, 2011, in United States District Court, in Chattanooga.

The indictment alleged Adler knowingly and intentionally dispensed, and cause to be dispensed, quantities of controlled substances, outside the scope of professional practice and not for a legitimate medical purpose. Among the controlled substances alleged to have been illegally prescribed are Oxycontin, Hydrocodone, Methadone, and Endocet.

The indictment further alleges Adler knowingly and intentionally dispensed, and caused to be dispensed, outside the scope of professional practice and not for a legitimate medical purpose, Oxycodone, that resulted in the deaths of two patients.

The illegal dispensing of controlled substances carries a maximum prison term of 20 years for Schedule II substances, and five years for Schedule III controlled substances. The maximum fine is $250,000 per count. The two counts alleging that death resulted from the illegal dispensing of Oxycodone each carry a minimum of 20 years to life in prison, a $1 million fine, and up to five years supervised release.

This indictment is the result of an investigation by the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation. Assistant U.S. Attorney John P. MacCoon will represent the United States.

Members of the public are reminded that an indictment constitutes only charges and that every person is presumed innocent until their guilt has been proven beyond a reasonable doubt.