Library board mulls no-smoking limits
by DELANEY WALKER, Banner Staff Writer
Mar 20, 2013 | 842 views | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Banner photo, DELANEY WALKER
CLEVELAND BRADLEY COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY board members met to discuss the library’s budget, potential for a radio frequency identification system, and the probability of making the library’s property nonsmoking.
Banner photo, DELANEY WALKER CLEVELAND BRADLEY COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY board members met to discuss the library’s budget, potential for a radio frequency identification system, and the probability of making the library’s property nonsmoking.
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Cleveland Bradley County Public Library board members discussed extending the limits of the no-smoking regulation to include additional property outside of the main building.

“We find so many places where they are throwing cigarettes,” said Andrew Hunt, library director. “I have already talked with the city attorney about the issue, but I have not received a final answer.”

Board members agreed making the property as a whole nonsmoking would not deter some patrons.

Hunt said it would be nice to at least move smoking patrons away from the front of the building.

John Hagler said many children visiting the library currently have to walk through the smoke to enter the building.

Member Stephen Wright said discarded cigarette butts are not aesthetically pleasing, especially as the library considers new landscaping ventures.

Hagler made a motion to pursue nonsmoking regulations for the library property.

“That is for the health of our patrons, including the children, and for maintaining the cleanliness of the premises,” Hagler said.

A nominating committee comprised of the board’s current president, vice president, treasurer and the library director will be responsible for recommending potential members to the board.

According to Tara Brown, board president, two current members, Evealyn Clowers and Tara Brown are set to leave early this summer.

She said the committee will meet within the next several weeks to decide on recommendations.

The board will need two new members, one to fill the city position and another as a library appointee.

Board members agreed the special meetings held with the Cleveland City Council and the Bradley County Commission went well.

“I feel like they both went very well, and the presentations were well received,” Brown said. “We showed goodwill toward them while also showing them what [the library has] been able to accomplish.”

Wright said several members from the Council and Commission congratulated them.

“I had a lot of elected officials say I had no idea our library does so many things,” Wright said. “We tell the story over and over and over again, so it is well known by us. We forget other people may not know.”

Brown suggested hosting the special meetings every two to three years.

Hunt has continued to visit other libraries to witness their radio frequency identification systems at work. He visited two libraries last month and is planning on making one more trip. He said he hopes the board will be able to make a decision soon.

RFID is the use of a wireless noncontact system that uses radio-frequency electromagnetic fields to transfer data from a tag attached to an object.

According to Hunt’s assessment, the technology allows for a more efficient self-checkout system. Presentations to the library by salesmen also support this idea.

The current self-checkout line at the library is still dependent on library personnel. A librarian must walk the materials around the security gate following checkout. The RFID system should cut out the librarian from the checkout process.

Hunt said the self-checkout machines will be optional. A librarian will still be available for checkout.

“I am the most challenged person here when it comes to [technology] and I even enjoyed the Brentwood system,” Hagler said of the board’s fact-finding visit to a library there. “If I went back to that library, I would do all that stuff — check in and check out. It was all easy.”

In additional news:

- Hunt said an end-of-the-year bonus is more likely than raises for employees, at this point.

- Since the last board meeting 48 adult programs were offered with 233 attendees; 37 children’s programs were offered with 881 attendees; and 10 teen programs were offered with 61 attendees.

- The Bookmobile has undergone repairs and is once again fully functional.