Make time to discover the true history of clocks
by Bettie Marlowe
Jul 10, 2013 | 474 views | 0 0 comments | 44 44 recommendations | email to a friend | print
THIS CLOCK that will be on display in the Exhibit during the Mid-South Regional Meeting of the National Association of Watch and Clock Collectors, Inc. will be the Rolling Ball Clock and the Strutt Clock.  The Congreve Rolling Ball Clock, right, was made from plans drawn by John Wilding. It is modeled after Sir William Congreve (1772-1828) who claimed credit for inventing the rolling ball clock and took out a patent for the design in 1808. This excellent example of craftsmanship is by R. M. Pack, member of the National Association of Watch and Clock Collectors.
The Strutt Clock, right, is one of the most interesting of all single train skeleton clocks ever conceived. First made by an Englishman, William Strutt, about 1830, it has a number of interesting and extremely unusual features not found in other clocks. This clock is an example of more than a half-century of craftsmanship by W. R. “Bill” Smith.  For more information on Bill Smith’s extensive contributions to horology, go to his website at www.wrsmithclocks.com.
THIS CLOCK that will be on display in the Exhibit during the Mid-South Regional Meeting of the National Association of Watch and Clock Collectors, Inc. will be the Rolling Ball Clock and the Strutt Clock. The Congreve Rolling Ball Clock, right, was made from plans drawn by John Wilding. It is modeled after Sir William Congreve (1772-1828) who claimed credit for inventing the rolling ball clock and took out a patent for the design in 1808. This excellent example of craftsmanship is by R. M. Pack, member of the National Association of Watch and Clock Collectors. The Strutt Clock, right, is one of the most interesting of all single train skeleton clocks ever conceived. First made by an Englishman, William Strutt, about 1830, it has a number of interesting and extremely unusual features not found in other clocks. This clock is an example of more than a half-century of craftsmanship by W. R. “Bill” Smith. For more information on Bill Smith’s extensive contributions to horology, go to his website at www.wrsmithclocks.com.
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The National Association of Watch and Clock Collectors Inc. will have its Mid-South Regional Meeting beginning Aug. 30 at Hamilton County Convention and Trade Center, 1150 Carter St., Chattanooga.

The convention begins at 9 a.m. on Friday and continues through Saturday for Public Day, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Membership is required for Friday’s schedule. For information on getting into the Mart on Friday, call Renee Coulson at 238-1555.

The Mid-South Regional meeting organizers are offering a public visitor’s day to nonmembers of the NAWCC. The Mart will be open Saturday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. when clocks, watches, part, tools, books and so forth will be for sale. Tickets are $10 per person (under 18 free).

The public can participate in all the functions on Saturday. Plan on arriving early. You will have the opportunity to experience the excitement of the MART, where there are typically 200-plus tables of clocks, watches, parts, tools, books and other time-keeping materials on hand for sale to the public. This is a great place to add items to your personal collection, or your inventory if you are a dealer.

The exhibit, “Horological Craftsmanship,” will be open from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. The exhibit provides a showcase for displaying examples of modern day craftsmanship in this highly skilled field. From the 15th century up through the mid-19th century, clocks and watches were mostly built by skilled craftsmen. You will have the opportunity to see working clocks crafted by some of our talented members. You will see examples of watchmaker lathes of an era long past, as well as modern day Sherline lathes in widespread use by hobbyists. The lathes will be shown with specific tool attachments for performing repairs or machining parts for clocks. A few specially made tools will be displayed to illustrate some of the skills needed by the modern day clockmaker. You will see some examples of painted dials, both original and restored by artists skilled in this facet of clockmaking.

At 10 a.m., Russ Youngs will present a lecture on “Surprises and Joys in Constructing My First Clock” in Room 19. All functions are in Exhibit Hall B, except for this lecture.

The Antique Watch and Clock Road Show event will be held from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. and will offer free evaluations for the public. If you have an antique timepiece that you would like to learn more about, bring it to the Chattanooga Convention Center, Exhibit Hall C between 10:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. on Aug. 31. Members of the National Association of Watch & Clock Collectors will be on hand, along with lots of reference books and price guides.

Find out more about your watch or clock. We’ll help you discover the history of your timepiece, not just when it was made, but the story of who made it, where, how and so forth. Many price guide books will be available to look up values that experts have published for similar watches and clocks. You will receive a completed evaluation form identifying your timepiece, but you cannot be given an official appraisal, and buying and selling is not permitted at the Roadshow event.

Richard Pack will lead an exhibit walking tour at 11:30 a.m.

The public will have the opportunity to buy items in the Mart, door prizes will be awarded and visitors can participate in a silent auction to be held at the conclusion of Saturday’s activities.

Founded in 1943, The National Association of Watch and Clock Collectors Inc., is a nonprofit scientific organization that serves as a unique educational, cultural, and social resource for its membership and the public at large. Members include hobbyists, students, educators, casual collectors and professionals in related retail and manufacturing trades. The one common bond (and main membership requirement) is a fascination with the art and science of timekeeping, or horology.

The NAWCC’s headquarters in Columbia, Pa., includes the NAWCC’s Library and Research Center, one of the largest horological libraries in the world. Housed within the National Watch and Clock Museum, the collection consists of more than 30,000 books, catalogs and periodicals dealing with all aspects of the study of time and timekeeping. Special collection material includes 231,000 American patents; postcards dealing with horological subjects; postal stamps showing timekeeping devices; ledgers and drawings from the Hamilton Watch Company; the Whitaker Westclox collection; and the personal papers of such noted horologists as Jesse Coleman, Orville Hagans, Barclay Stephens, Robert Franks, James W. Gibbs, Albert Potter and Charles Alvah Smith.

The National Watch and Clock Museum was officially opened to the public in 1977 with fewer than 1,000 items, but since that time, the collection has increased to 12,000-plus items. The museum is a journey through the history and science of time! Museum visitors experience a fun and fascinating trip into the world of timekeeping that is international in scope and covers a wide variety of clocks, watches, tools and other time-related items. The major fraction of the collection consists of 19th-century American clocks and watches, with significant examples of early English tall case clocks, Asian timepieces from Japan and China, and timekeeping devices from Germany, France, the Netherlands and Russia. Chronologically, the exhibits take you on a tour through the entire history of timekeeping technology from early nonmechanical devices to today's atomic and radio-controlled clocks.

For more information, visit www.nawcc.org online; or email reneecoulson@epbfi.com.