PCL, Habitat team for a second B2B
by DELANEY WALKER, Banner Staff Writer
Aug 09, 2013 | 1174 views | 0 0 comments | 17 17 recommendations | email to a friend | print
PEOPLE FOR CARE AND LEARNING staff members have been working hard to spread the word on the upcoming Bike 2 Build event set for Saturday, Oct. 26. From left are, Fred Garmon, executive director; Katelyne Schmidgall, administrative assistant; Ivey Lawrence, director of events and logistics; Brittany Cox, financial administrator; and Jake Stum, director of program and development. Banner photo, DELANEY WALKER
PEOPLE FOR CARE AND LEARNING staff members have been working hard to spread the word on the upcoming Bike 2 Build event set for Saturday, Oct. 26. From left are, Fred Garmon, executive director; Katelyne Schmidgall, administrative assistant; Ivey Lawrence, director of events and logistics; Brittany Cox, financial administrator; and Jake Stum, director of program and development. Banner photo, DELANEY WALKER
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People for Care and Learning and Habitat for Humanity of Cleveland’s partnership has created another boon for area residents with the announcement of the upcoming Bike 2 Build.

The new biking event is set for Saturday, Oct. 26, and will directly complement Habitat’s spring Bike to Build.

Both organizations have been working closely to spread awareness about the upcoming event.

Ivey Lawrence, PCL director of events and logistics, has been planning alongside Habitat’s Brittany Sloan.

“Everything will be consistent — the prices, the sponsorship levels,” Lawrence said. “We are matching what Habitat is doing.”

Only two differences separate the events. First, the fall B2B will raise funds for PCL, whereas the spring Bike to Build is a Habitat fundraiser. Second, the courses will be different.

Matt Carlson, executive director of Habitat for Humanity, said the two courses will give participants two different views of Bradley County he says “you may not realize unless you are on the back of a bike.”

Both events give money to organizations focused on improving the lives of others through providing shelter.

The predominately local Habitat and the international-minded PCL have chosen to partner several times over their shared vision.

“There are just so many core values that are similar with both of our organizations. A lot of our leadership styles are the same and the core values of our boards are a lot alike,” Garmon said. “We love to find ways to collaborate and gain synergy at the local level.”

Added Garmon, “A lot of people don’t know our local Habitat builds homes on an international level. So they have a local presence and a global one, which we like to refer as ‘glocal.’”

Cleveland’s Habitat has been involved in building homes in both El Salvador and Cambodia. The organization is also behind the local Century Village and various goodwill construction projects.

According to Garmon, Carlson was instrumental in creating a partnership between PCL and Habitat for Humanity of Cambodia. The Cambodia-based group then placed PCL in contact with the Habitat for Humanity of Australia.

From these new partnerships sprang the opportunity to receive funding for 70 homes as a part of PCL’s Build a City project in Cambodia.

International Habitat officials have are currently inspecting 35 homes for structural issues, placement and functionality. PCL was awarded $35,000 prior to construction to complete the promised homes. Following the completion of post-construction inspection, an additional $35,000 will be awarded for the final 35 homes.

Carlson said collaboration is needed in the nonprofit world to leverage each organization’s resources to get the most accomplished.

“I think that proved itself after the tornadoes of 2011 that hit here,” Carlson said. “You had a whole community come together that basically said we will do whatever to get the job done.”

He said the organizations were able to do more together than they would have a part.

Now the same thought process is being applied to the biking events.

“Our job during the fall event is to raise the awareness for Habitat’s ride in the spring,” Garmon said. “We have two different constituents we are reaching out to in the community.”

Carlson emphasized how the spring Bike to Build has grown over the past four years. Participants in last year’s event represented nine states. He believes the growth will continue.

“The spring event is a good, quality event. If a rider goes and loves it, then they can expect the same event in the fall,” Carlson said. “They know it is going to be quality, they will have good things in the bag, they will understand the message and they will have a fun ride.”

A special incentive for participating in both events in one year will also be offered to participants.

For more information visit peopleforcare.org/biketobuild/.