WVHS Key Club members eye upcoming projects at school
by JOYANNA LOVE Banner Senior Staff Writer
Nov 20, 2013 | 761 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
WALKER VALLEY HIGH SCHOOL Principal Danny Coggin stands with Key Club vice president Rebecca Meigs, president Blake Kitterman, secretary Chloe Isbill and faculty adviser David Hood. Banner photo, JOYANNA LOVE
WALKER VALLEY HIGH SCHOOL Principal Danny Coggin stands with Key Club vice president Rebecca Meigs, president Blake Kitterman, secretary Chloe Isbill and faculty adviser David Hood. Banner photo, JOYANNA LOVE
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Walker Valley High School Key Club shared plans for upcoming projects during a recent Kiwanis of Cleveland meeting.

The club is partnering with UNICEF to eliminate tetanus.

“The tetanus largely affects newborn children in Third World countries whose families are too poor to afford sanitary flooring. When a baby is born on such dirty floors the tetanus is spread from the floor to the child,” Key club president Blake Kitterman said.

The club is also raising funds for the Ronald McDonald House Charities.

“As the Christmas season gets near, service projects are set in place,” Kitterman said.

The club president said the students will participate in The Salvation Army’s bell-ringing campaign and partnering with the school’s marketing club to participate in Creating Christmas Memories.”

WVHS Principal Danny Coggin said the school consistently had 250 to 300 students come out to help with the event.

Kitterman said the club hopes to partner with the Cleveland Key Club to complete a service project together.

“I want to thank you for your sponsorship of Key Club at Walker Valley High School,” Coggin said.

He said the students do great things.

Coggin said service to the community has always been an emphasis at the school.

“We want the community to know that we are grateful for all that we have been given,” Coggin said

Walker Valley High School’s Key Club started with eight students and has grown to more than 20 participants.

“We have a bright future ahead of us because of you,” Kitterman said.

Kiwanians also received an update on Walker Valley as a whole.

“This year we expanding … we are adding eight classrooms,” Coggin said.

The additional classrooms will help accommodate a student enrollment that has doubled in size since the school opened.

“The good things about those eight classrooms is [they are] … tornado proof,” Coggin said.

The cafeteria has also been expanded.

Coggin said the mission of WVHS is to make sure students know they have a firm foundation for life after graduation.

Graduates from WVHS attend colleges and universities across the country, attend military academies or go straight into the workforce.

Coggin said students need to be prepared to be leaders in the community.

According to the National Student Clearinghouse, 72 percent of graduates go onto college. Of those students, 80 percent return for their sophomore year of college.

The academy approach at the high school gives students a real world approach to academics. In their sophomore year, students choose from the business and medical, humanities or STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) tracks.

“It has career connections. It has real world connections and it has college connections,” Coggin said. “It gives students the opportunity to hear from students who think like they do, and those things help them learn better and help them grow.”

Students can also receive an additional challenge by taking AP or dual enrollment courses.

The high school has a 95 percent graduation rate.