Salvage helping to save lives
by MARY K. SHACKLEFORD Banner Intern
Dec 04, 2013 | 319 views | 0 0 comments | 29 29 recommendations | email to a friend | print
All Metal Salvage has a dumpster outside their doors, as well as an eye-catching sign that reads, “Free anytime drop off. Drop off your unwanted scrap metal to help cure childhood diseases.” Mike Hoddent, in wheelchair, owns and operates the salvage company.
All Metal Salvage has a dumpster outside their doors, as well as an eye-catching sign that reads, “Free anytime drop off. Drop off your unwanted scrap metal to help cure childhood diseases.” Mike Hoddent, in wheelchair, owns and operates the salvage company.
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Mike Hoddent, who operates the All Metal Salvage on 1050 Inman St., said he has always been sentimental with the children of St. Jude hospital and wanted to help children fight cancer.

“The commercials you see on TV make you emotional as you see the young children with cancer,” Hoddent said, so when he and his wife decided to choose a foundation to donate to, they chose St. Jude Children’s Research Center.

According to stjude.org, St. Jude’s is unlike any other pediatric treatment and research facility. Discoveries made there have completely changed how the world treats children with cancer and other catastrophic diseases. With research and patient care under one roof, St. Jude’s is where some of today’s most gifted researchers are able to do science more quickly.

For the past six weeks, All Metal Salvage has had a dumpster outside of their doors, as well as an eye-catching sign that reads, “Free anytime drop off. Drop off your unwanted scrap metal to help cure childhood diseases. All Metal Salvage will donate 100 percent of the proceeds from this container to St. Jude Children’s research center.” The dumpster is a place where anyone can drop off used microwaves, stoves and other scrap metal.

The dumpster was placed outside their doors to be in position for people to drop off used metals whenever is convenient for them. They weigh the metals as the dumpster gets full, and then a check will be sent to St. Jude’s for that amount.

So far, one check has been sent to St. Jude’s, and Hoddent said he couldn’t wait to see the many smiles on the children’s faces. He encourages everyone to visit All Metal Salvage as an alternative to the dump, as they join to donate the proceeds from all scrap metal to the St. Jude hospital.

Hoddent said people come by every day and they will be able to see the sign, and I recommend all people to donate to this cause.” His father-in-law recently had surgery and his family have been going through a lot. However, despite the things they are going through, they still make time to care for the children of St.Jude hosptial.

Iscrap4kids is another program that has donated proceeds from scrap metal to this cause. Through website gogreenamericantv.com, the iScrap App Team is inviting all scrap- and other related-industry partners to raise funds to benefit St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

Over the last two years the iScrap4Kids and the scrap metal industry have raised almost $10,000 for cancer research at St. Jude’s.

According to earth911.com/news, recycling and reusing items like plastic bottles, hand-me-down clothing and newspapers is important to make part of one’s every day routine to help increase the green movement. One section of the recycling industry that may not be as popular, but just as important, is scrap metal recycling.

Scrap metal is one of the largest exports in the United States and by recycling metals, the amount of ore drilling is reduced throughout the world. However, some of these metals including copper, steel, aluminum, brass, iron and wires, are often tossed in the garbage due to the lack of knowledge and sources for metal recycling.

Hoddent said they’re here to help educate the community to keep an eye out for those opportunities to grab some metal and bring it to the right place.

His hope, he said, is to “see more people donate and take part of this wonderful cause” helping the St. Jude Children’s Research Center.