Ringstaff gets high marks by school board
by DELANEY WALKER Banner Staff Writer
Feb 12, 2014 | 967 views | 0 0 comments | 18 18 recommendations | email to a friend | print
CLEVELAND HIGH SCHOOL Culinary Arts instructor Chef Clyde Rush and two of his students prepared food for the Board of Education Monday night. From left front, are junior Esmeralda Uribe and Autumn O’Bryan, CHS principal; back, Rush and freshman David Donan. 
Banner photo, DELANEY WALKER
CLEVELAND HIGH SCHOOL Culinary Arts instructor Chef Clyde Rush and two of his students prepared food for the Board of Education Monday night. From left front, are junior Esmeralda Uribe and Autumn O’Bryan, CHS principal; back, Rush and freshman David Donan. Banner photo, DELANEY WALKER
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The Cleveland Board of Education announced the scores for Director of City Schools Dr. Martin Ringstaff at Monday night’s formal gathering.

Each board member met with Ringstaff in a one-on-one meeting to assess him in seven standards.

Board Chairman Tom Cloud reported a 5 was the top score possible. Ringstaff’s overall score was a 4.97.

“That is an excellent score,” Cloud said. “It shows we appreciate our superintendent and have lots of high hopes and faith in him. We understand he is leading our school system in the right direction.”

The standards and scores included:

n Standard 1: Vision of Learning, 5

n Standard 2: School Culture and Instructional Program, 4.94

n Standard 3: Management and Operation, 4.96

n Standard 4: Collaboration with Families and Community, 4.96

n Standard 5: Integrity, Fairness and Ethics, 5

n Standard 6: Political, Social and Cultural Context, 4.95

n Standard 7: Superintendent and Board Relationship, 4.97.

Board member Dr. Murl Dirksen requested an explanation of the scores be given to those in attendance: 5, exceeds expectations, distinguished; 4, accomplished, commendable; 3, proficient, average; 2, developing, or needs improvement; and 1, not demonstrated or unsatisfactory.

The Bradley Cleveland Public Education Foundation continued the presentations with an update by President Matt Bentley.

He reported $50,000 was awarded to both the Cleveland and Bradley County school systems through the foundation’s mini grants and team grants.

A total of 12 grants went to the city schools. The numbers were split between nine mini grants and three team grants. Each dealt with a component of STEM: science, technology, engineering and math.

Bentley announced the foundation received a $40,000 Fund for Teachers grant for “professional development experiences.” Teachers have the opportunity to apply for either a $5,000 individual grant or a $10,000 team grant to study abroad over the summer.

Four submissions were made by Cleveland teachers for the grants. Points of destination include: Alaska, the United Kingdom, Germany, Czech Republic, Poland and Holland. Three sessions were held to help teachers write up their proposals.

“This is a unique opportunity for teachers to be able to travel to a geographic region that deals with the subject they are teaching,” Bentley said. “They can receive first-hand experience, see monuments, visit with townfolk— whatever. They can bring it back to the classroom and share it with their students.”

He said the foundation is very excited to provide the experience for teachers in the area.

The foundation will also be the fiscal agent for the $50,000 United Way Health Endowment grant for telemedicine. According to Bentley, the foundation will work alongside Coordinated School Health to meet the health needs of both Bradley County and Cleveland schools through the use of the Ronald McDonald Care Mobile. The care mobile currently goes to three Bradley County Schools and two Cleveland schools.

Bentley announced and thanked the Tucker Foundation for its grant of over $115,000 to aid in the foundation’s operating costs.

Bentley said the mission of the Bradley Cleveland Public Education Foundation is twofold.

“It is to provide private funding, but it is also to be a strong advocate in the community for your system,” Bentley said.

He explained the foundation has been meeting with both the county and city school board members in an effort to learn the individual systems’ messages. He said the goal is to use the information to become a larger advocate for the public schools.

Board member Dawn Robinson said the community needs to empower the funding bodies to fund the new elementary school and high school gymnasium, in addition to internal programs.

“These are not things we hope to have in the future. These are things we need right now,” Robinson said. “I’m not sure how that is going to work.”

Continued Robinson, “[The City Council] is going to be constrained by people who don’t believe in music and arts, don’t support better buildings and don’t support bigger gyms. They need to hear from us who support these things and they need to hear us loud and clear.”