Civil War hospitals, medicine display set at local public library
Mar 02, 2014 | 1048 views | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
The 6th Cavalry Museum in Fort Oglethorpe, Ga., has partnered with the Cleveland Bradley County Public Library to display a special traveling exhibit, “The Blood Ran Blue and Gray.” The four-panel display focuses on the hospitals and medical care given during and after the Civil War’s Battle of Chickamauga, in September 1863.
The 6th Cavalry Museum in Fort Oglethorpe, Ga., has partnered with the Cleveland Bradley County Public Library to display a special traveling exhibit, “The Blood Ran Blue and Gray.” The four-panel display focuses on the hospitals and medical care given during and after the Civil War’s Battle of Chickamauga, in September 1863.
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FORT OGLETHORPE, Ga. — As the nation continues to commemorate the American Civil War (1861–65), the 6th Cavalry Museum in Fort Oglethorpe, Ga., has partnered with the Cleveland Bradley County Public Library to display a special traveling exhibit, “The Blood Ran Blue and Gray.”

The four-panel display focuses on the hospitals and medical care given during and after the Civil War’s Battle of Chickamauga, in September 1863. The traveling exhibit was sponsored by the Fort Oglethorpe Tourism Association.

Interpreting Times Past LLC owner Connie Huddleston, an historic preservation consultant and designer of interpretive materials for several state parks and museums, researched and developed the display panels and school teaching trunks for fifth and eighth grade.

Huddleston feels the displays have wide appeal as they include authentic images of surgical instruments, photos, first-hand accounts from the soldiers and their caregivers, maps of the hospitals and other facts.

Those viewing the displays will be transported back in time to the Civil War and have their curiosity piqued.

How did a wounded soldier get to a field hospital? Was anesthesia used?

“Personal stories of real people on the battlefield and in the hospitals are usually what we remember as we can relate and learn. They will remember these stories more than the statistics of numbers of injured and killed.”

The panels are titled “Medical Treatment During the Civil War,” “Stories from the Wounded and Their Caregivers,” “Failure and Success in Treating the Wounded at Chickamauga,” and “Battlefield Medical Care — the Reality of Inexperience.”

The 6th Cavalry Museum has also donated one copy of its Civil War regimental history to the library. “The 6th United States Cavalry in the Civil War: A History and Roster” was written by Donald Caughey and Jimmy Jones.

Jones is an active duty cavalry officer who has served two tours of duty in the 6th U.S. Cavalry and visited the 6th Cavalry Museum in May 2013 for a book signing prior to his deployment to Kuwait.

Jones donated copies of his book to the museum and asked that a copy be given to area libraries.

The Post at Fort Oglethorpe and the 6th Cavalry share a long association with the Bradley County area.

“The 6th was permanently stationed at Fort Oglethorpe from 1919-42, with Bendabout Farm teams playing polo against the regiment’s cavalry teams,” according to museum director Christine McKeever. Thousands of soldiers, WACs and civil servants from across the region called Fort Oglethorpe home from 1902-47.

The four panel display can be viewed on the second floor of the library, where it will be through April 4.

The 6th Cavalry Museum preserves the rich military history of the “Fighting 6th” Cavalry, stationed at The Post at Fort Oglethorpe (1919-42). Located on the Post’s original parade ground/polo field, the area is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, surrounded by officers’ homes and other Post buildings. The nonprofit museum houses artifacts, uniforms, weapons, accouterments, photos, and a Patton tank.

The 6th was the only regular cavalry regiment raised during the Civil War. Unlike volunteer regiments raised by individual states, this cavalry regiment, by war’s end, had 2,130 men and at least one woman from 29 states and 14 countries. The regiment’s initial cast of officers included two grandsons of a former president and a cousin of Confederate President Jefferson Davis.

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www.6thcavalrymuseum.org