CSCC’s OneSource to train workers in emergency medical procedures
by CHRISTY ARMSTRONG Banner Staff Writer
Mar 24, 2014 | 832 views | 0 0 comments | 8 8 recommendations | email to a friend | print
CLEVELAND STATE COMMUNITY COLLEGE is gearing up to offer a new emergency medical responder training course for employees of area manufacturers. It represents a partnership between two of the college’s departments. Devette Carter, chair of the college’s emergency medical technician program, and Rick Creasy, director of workforce development, display one of the mannequins students will be using as they practice their medical training.
CLEVELAND STATE COMMUNITY COLLEGE is gearing up to offer a new emergency medical responder training course for employees of area manufacturers. It represents a partnership between two of the college’s departments. Devette Carter, chair of the college’s emergency medical technician program, and Rick Creasy, director of workforce development, display one of the mannequins students will be using as they practice their medical training.
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The OneSource Workforce Readiness Center at Cleveland State Community College has been planning a new program to help train employees at area manufacturers.

Director of Workforce Development Rick Creasy said the center is ready to begin to train people to be emergency medical responders.

While it is not uncommon for manufacturers to have medical personnel on site in the event something goes wrong, the center has received a few calls from area employers asking if they could offer emergency medical training, Creasy said.

The center currently offers training on manufacturing skills like working with machinery. A company interested in hiring new employees can work with the college to provide the training for promising job candidates.

Students in those job training programs learn in the classroom and are evaluated on their performance. The college’s instructors then recommend which students they think the company should interview for the job openings.

While the subject matter for the new program will be completely different, the process will be similar. The center will be working with the instructors of the college’s emergency medical technician program to create a new program focused on working in an industrial setting.

“We have all the equipment, and all the staff to provide this,” Creasy said.

Devette Carter, chair of Cleveland State’s emergency medical technician program, said certified emergency medical response trainers — many of them existing Cleveland State faculty members — will be on call for scheduled sessions of the new training program with the workforce readiness center.

The training will consist of 60 classroom hours and cover a variety of topics. Ethical and legal issues, lifting and moving patients, clearing airways and dealing with injuries and other medical emergencies are just a few of the topics that will be addressed.

“It’s your initial first aid,” Carter said.

Using both lectures and hands-on teaching methods, she said the training will focus on “quick fixes” for things like helping a person who has stopped breathing or sustained an injury like a broken bone. The focus will be on knowing how to help someone until an ambulance can arrive.

While it will not be as extensive as some of the other types of training the college offers, Carter said it will be a good “stepping stone” to other types of training.

Once a student completes the training with the workforce readiness center, they have the option to take the state and national exams to become certified emergency medical responders and earn certifications that are good for two years. After that, a student could enroll in Cleveland State’s EMT program and, even further down the line, train to be a paramedic.

Like the workforce readiness center’s existing manufacturing trainings, instructors can make personnel recommendations to the employers if requested. However, unlike some of its more technical manufacturing trainings that are specific to certain companies, Creasy said the new emergency medical training will be open to anyone who wants to participate.

Employees or job candidates sponsored by multiple companies can be in the same class together. In fact, anyone interested in the emergency medical training can participate as long as they pay their own $950 tuition.

Creasy said the training would hopefully result in more qualified people being on hand at local manufacturing plants in the event of an emergency. He said representatives from “more and more” local companies have expressed their desire to make that happen.

Because mere minutes can count in an emergency situation, Carter said it is important that those working in industrial settings plan for potential emergencies and make sure there are people working in their plant who know what to do.

While many local companies have safety committees, Creasy said many are finding they want to have extra help in that area. If they so choose, companies could send some of their current employees to Cleveland State for extra training.

“I think this will be good for the industries as well as the community,” Carter said, adding good emergency medical training has been known to save lives.

The new training course requires a minimum of eight students at a time, and Creasy said it can begin as soon as there are enough interested students.

For more information, visit www.clevelandstatecc.edu/onesource.