BICC plans ‘So You Think You’ve Got Talent’ show for April 25
by DELANEY WALKER Banner Staff Writer
Apr 17, 2014 | 1008 views | 0 0 comments | 10 10 recommendations | email to a friend | print
STARFISH DIRECTOR Corinne Freeman looks over the 10 acts chosen for the second annual “So You Think You’ve Got Talent” show alongside fellow Bradley Initiative for Church and Community co-worker Joe Mullins. Banner photo, DELANEY WALKER
STARFISH DIRECTOR Corinne Freeman looks over the 10 acts chosen for the second annual “So You Think You’ve Got Talent” show alongside fellow Bradley Initiative for Church and Community co-worker Joe Mullins. Banner photo, DELANEY WALKER
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Contestants from across Bradley County will go head-to-head in the upcoming “So You Think You’ve Got Talent” show hosted by Bradley Initiative for Church and Community’s Starfish program.

The family-friendly event will take place Friday, April 25, at 7 p.m. in Lee University’s Dixon Center.

Starfish Director Corinne Freeman promised the show is packed with talent. Acts of interest include a husband-and-wife ragtime performance and a hip-hop dance team. Two rock bands, several soloists, a young piano composer, several songwriters and a duet round out the entertainment list.

Quart Jars, the first-place winners of last year’s talent show, will return to kick off the night. Freeman remained quiet on the name of the songs the group will sing. However, she hinted Quart Jars will sing a medley of tunes currently enjoyed by children, teens and parents alike.

Audience members at the first community talent show last year suggested finding strong, unique talents. The panel of judges present at the auditions took the suggestion into consideration. Seventeen acts signed up, with only 10 chosen for the big event.

“All were really, really top-notch talent. It was very difficult for the judges this year to make a decision at auditions,” Freeman said. “We [chose the acts] based upon their abilities, but also on the type of talent they presented.”

Feedback provided by judges, participants and audience members of last year’s show resulted in a change in the awards.

Instead of first place, all 10 acts will be up for the $500 grand prize. Additional prizes will be awarded for most original performance, $200; most talented up-and-coming star, $200; and honorable mention, $100.

The new award system will hypothetically protect the integrity of the diverse talents.

“We really felt like we wanted to recognize those unique qualities of the talent,” Freeman said. “Being able to compose an original piece — to sing it or play it — takes a lot of time and skill.”

She explained the goal is to honor each act’s original work while still recognizing contestants who place a “twist” on an existing song.

Three judges will determine who goes home with a heavy wallet. Freeman said she is only at liberty to mention two: Jeremiah Pritchard, a longtime director of the Revolution Show Choir at Lake Forest Middle School; and Amy Card-Lillios, a local resident known for her rich history in theater and dance.

Tickets are on sale for $10. The price will increase to $12 the night of the event. They can be purchased online at bicc-inc.org or at the BICC office, 2810 Westside Dr. N.W., Suite E, near the Pine Ridge Regional Medical Clinic.

All funds will benefit the Starfish program, an early childhood-focused initiative.

“Our motto is, ‘Every Child Counts.’ Every child, everywhere has an important role to play and deserves the best chance to become whatever they will become in life,” Freeman said. “We really strive to partner with families in order to [inform] parents, who are their children’s first teachers, that what they do impacts their children not only in those early years, but throughout their child’s life.”

Ralph Buckner Funeral Home is the headlining, gold-level sponsor of the event.