Security lighting focused by CU
by RICK NORTON Associate Editor
May 27, 2014 | 1136 views | 0 0 comments | 11 11 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Borden
Borden
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In the middle of growth-inspired projects like widening roads, rebuilding interchanges, residential developments and electric grid upgrades that are taking the lion’s share of time and attention by Cleveland Utilities crews and contractors, one that likely will soar just under the community’s radar is a new, more efficient form of security lighting.

But its improvements — in cost, quality and longevity — haven’t been lost on the crowded desk of Bart Borden, vice president of the CU Electric Division.

The new LED security lighting was included in Borden’s recent monthly report to the Cleveland Board of Public Utilities. Although it was listed No. 9 on the department head’s detailed agenda, Borden didn’t hold back on his enthusiasm for the new outdoor lighting fixture that he said will provide improved illumination at a lower cost for customers and the utility company.

“We’re excited about this [new security lighting],” Borden told board members. He said its advantages, one of which is less maintenance, are sure to capture the eye of CU customers.

“The standard security yard light has historically been a 100-watt high-pressure sodium fixture,” Borden explained. “The new LED fixture is 48 watts and requires half the energy.”

That’s one savings. Another is longevity.

“The fixture also has an expected burn life that is four times that of the high-pressure sodium fixture, which will result in lower maintenance cost,” Borden stated.

The LED fixtures will cost $6.29 per month compared to $6.33 per month for the standard 100-watt HPS, he said.

“The [LED] fixture also emits a white light versus a yellow cast light of the HPS,” the longtime electric engineer noted.

Compared to many of Cleveland Utilities’ mega-projects that are aimed at accommodating continued growth within the Cleveland and Bradley County community, the new LED security lighting could pale in intensity, but Borden suggested it’s a small step in the big picture of customer service.

Updates on other projects that involve the CU Electric Division, some of which have dominated news headlines for months, included:

n Work is progressing by the Cherokee Construction contractor on CU’s district substation that includes a storage and bathroom building. As of the CU board session, the contractor had completed the concrete exterior walls and the roof trusses were near completion.

n The main portion of the Durkee Road and Benton Pike utility relocation project has been completed with some minor service transfer work still needed along Benton Pike. As of Borden’s report, AT&T and Charter Communications still had facilities on CU’s existing poles on Durkee Road. The poles were scheduled to be removed once AT&T and Charter had completed their transfers. The utility line and pole relocation are part of the road-widening project for both Durkee Road and Benton Pike that will provide better access and egress to the new Whirlpool manufacturing plant.

n Work was completed by CU and TVA to design for relocation transmission lines to accommodate new road construction by the Tennessee Department of Transportation for the new APD 40 interchange at Stone Lake Road.

n Launched electric design work on the new Weeks Drive townhome development that will consist of eight 4-unit townhomes.

n Issued a work order for additional [electricity] load to Dockins Graphics located at 1907 Overhead Bridge Road. A transformer station is being upgraded to accommodate the increased load.

n Design work was completed on an East Cleveland transmission line upgrade and a work order was issued to begin the physical work.

In traffic reports, Borden provided two updates.

n Traffic counts were obtained on Parkwood Trail at the request of the city of Cleveland. Traffic counts were obtained at Parkwood Trail and Crestview Drive N.W. Subsequently, the Cleveland Department of Public Works has now installed traffic direction “stop” signs at Parkwood Trail and Cookedale Trail N.W.

n CU furnished Bradley County engineer Sandra Knight with a cost estimate to upgrade two traffic controllers to current vintage equipment. The estimate ranges from $2,575 to $3,932. Borden said the information was furnished for budgetary purposes for county government to consider.

In other developments during the Cleveland Board of Public Utilities gathering, members:

n Approved a purchase order with King Industries valued at $139,623 for the rehabilitation of the north gravity thickener located at the Wastewater Treatment Plant. The rehabilitation project was budgeted for Fiscal Year 2014.

n Approved a purchase order with Talley Construction Company Inc. valued at $204,502 for the replacement of water lines along Marion Circle S.E., J Mack Circle S.W. and Chippewa Avenue S.E. This represents a total of 4,486 feet of 6-inch water main that will be installed. The project was budgeted for FY 2014.

n Approved a purchase order with W & O Construction valued at $133,550 for the replacement of gates at the Candies Creek Sewage Pumping Station located off Georgetown Road. The project was budgeted for FY 2014.

n Approved a Memorandum of Agreement between Norfolk Southern Railway Company and the Cleveland Board of Public Utilities which establishes fees for the crossing of Norfolk Southern properties with water and sewer pipelines and electric power lines. The fees relate to new crossings and upgrading existing crossings. Term of the agreement is five years. Borden said the new agreement establishes a more streamlined process for CU and Norfolk.

n The next Cleveland Board of Public Utilities formal session is scheduled for Thursday, May 29, at 3 p.m. in the Tom Wheeler Training Center.

Inset Quote:

“The standard security yard light has historically been a 100-watt high-pressure sodium fixture. The new LED fixture is 48 watts and requires half the energy. The fixture also has an expected burn life that is four times that of the high-pressure sodium fixture, which will result in lower maintenance cost.” — Bart Borden