Lee University presents at Vancouver
Aug 24, 2014 | 744 views | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Dr. Jeneva Moseley
Dr. Jeneva Moseley
slideshow
Dr. Laura Singletary
Dr. Laura Singletary
slideshow
Drs. Jeneva Moseley and Laura Singletary, assistant professors of mathematics at Lee University, recently presented research at the Joint Meeting of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (PME 38) and the North American Chapter of the Psychology of Mathematics Education (PME-NA 36). The meeting took place in Vancouver, Canada, this past July.

The conference, titled “Mathematics Education at the Edge,” provided the opportunity to highlight and examine mathematics education research that is breaking new ground or on the cutting edge of innovative research and research methodologies. Its goal was to explore issues with groups that are often positioned at the edge or periphery of educational research.

“Considering there were only about 600 people in attendance from all over the world, the fact that Lee had two professors making research presentations is quite an honor,” said Moseley. “It was a blessing for us to have this opportunity to exchange ideas with world leaders in our field.”

Moseley chaired a session about teaching proofs in geometry and presented a poster about academic language.

“New teachers are commonly evaluated on their use of academic language, but their perceptions of academic language are typically fragmented and misaligned with how they are being evaluated,” said Moseley. “My poster brought this to light in hopes that this dilemma can be resolved through teacher education or through reforming methods for evaluating teachers.”

In Singletary’s research talk, she presented an analytical framework detailing the kinds of mathematical connections teachers make during instruction.

“Making mathematical connections are an important part of developing a meaningful understanding of mathematics,” Singletary said. “My research examined the kinds of mathematical connections that teachers make for and with their students and developed a framework to differentiate among the kinds of connections they made in practice.”

According to Singletary, she will continue using this framework to examine how teachers support their students in engaging in the process of making mathematical connections.

Moseley began teaching at Lee in August of 2013. She received her PhD in theory and practice in teacher education with a concentration in mathematics education from the University of Tennessee in Knoxville. She graduated from Lee in 2001 with a triple major in mathematics, mathematics education, and English education.Singletary joined Lee’s faculty in fall 2012. She earned her doctorate in mathematics education from the University of Georgia and was awarded the Presidential Graduate Fellowship. She received her master’s and bachelor’s degrees from Lee University. While studying at Lee, Singletary was a Centennial Scholar and recipient of the departmental mathematics award.For more information about PME-NA, visit www.pmena.org.